CULTURE ART AND HERITAGE

Great Australian Bucket List

A visit to Uluru is at the top of many bucket lists.

Australia bursts with jaw-dropping sights and experiences equal of any the world over.

And if COVID-19 has taught us anything, it's to seize the moment and appreciate the immense treasure that's in our backyard.

This great Australian bucket list captures just some of the iconic destinations that we should experience at least once in our lifetime.

So when the opportunity arises again - if it hasn't already – start ticking these amazing experiences off your list.

The Daintree dazzles. Credit: Tourism and Events Queensland.

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, NT

When it comes to iconic Australian images, Uluru quickly comes to mind. This 348m-high sandstone rock is mesmerising, intricate, and massive. And then there’s the towering dome-like peaks that make up Kata Tjuta.

Admire it all in several memorable ways, including strolling along picturesque walking tracks, sunrise and sunset camel tours, scenic flights, and incredible outdoor dining experiences.

Nearest BIG4 park: BIG4 MacDonnell Range Holiday Park, Alice Springs.

Uluru is as iconic as it gets. Credit: Tourism NT/Jackson Groves.

Great Barrier Reef, QLD

One of the Seven Wonders of the Natural World, the Great Barrier Reef had to make this list. As the world's largest coral reef, it hoards a profusion of marine and coral life and is home to hundreds of islands and their beaches.

The reef offers some of the best diving and snorkelling opportunities on the planet, or scenic boat tours and flights for those who prefer to stay dry, and plenty of other pinch-me experiences. Explore this treasure with ease from myriad destinations dotted along the QLD coast.

Accommodation options: BIG4 parks in QLD.

A true wonder: the Great Barrier Reef. Credit: Tourism and Events Queensland.

South West WA

There is so much treasure crammed into this epic pocket of WA that it almost defies belief, including shimmering beaches mixed with dramatic coastline and funky rock formations, sprawling forests and their towering trees, and captivating caves. Throw in wine regions led by iconic Margaret River, myriad microbreweries, and engrossing historical attractions, and you have a destination with absolute must-visit status.

Accommodation options: BIG4 parks in South West WA.

Highlights abound in South West WA. Pictured: Greens Pool, William Bay National Park. Credit: Tourism Western Australia.

Cradle Mountain, TAS

This eye-catching Tassie mountain is used to starring in front of the camera, and it’s easy to see why. Cradle Mountain’s jagged shape and the rugged landscape that surrounds it create an aura of being among true wilderness.

Ample walking tracks of various gradings and distances within Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park provide the best platform for soaking up the astounding scenery.

Accommodation options: BIG4 parks in TAS.

Cradle Mountain and Dove Lake make a perfect pair.

Daintree Rainforest, QLD

This is the oldest-surviving tropical rainforest on earth, and the humongous region is divine. Part of the wider Wet Tropics of Queensland World Heritage area, the Daintree houses an incredible variety of flora and fauna; much of it rare. A visit here will leave you feeling as though you’re in another world.

Daintree National Park is found within these sprawling surrounds and has two distinct sections to discover – Mossman Gorge and Cape Tribulation. Both offer extraordinary visual delights.

Accommodation options: BIG4 Port Douglas Glengarry Holiday Park, BIG4 Cairns Crystal Cascades Holiday Park, and BIG4 Ingenia Holidays Cairns Coconut Resort.

Mossman Gorge is a gem within Daintree National Park. Credit: Tourism and Events Queensland.

World-famous wine regions of SA

SA's reputation for producing outstanding wine stretches across the globe, and there’s no better way to appreciate this than being in the heart of the action. Wind your way around the cellar-doors of the Barossa, Clare Valley, McLaren Vale, and the Coonawarra and mix incredible views and tranquil environments with delicious wine.

Accommodation options:

Barossa: BIG4 Barossa Tourist Park.

Coonawarra: BIG4 Naracoorte Holiday Park or BIG4 Blue Lake Holiday Park.

McLaren Vale: BIG4 Port Willunga Tourist Park, BIG4 Cape Jervis Accommodation & Caravan Park, or BIG4 Port Elliot Holiday Park.

SA's wine regions are world class. Pictured: Mollydooker Wines, McLaren Vale. Credit: Isaac Forman/Serio.

Great Ocean Road, VIC

Arguably Australia’s most famous drive, the Great Ocean Road is dominated by spellbinding sights. A seemingly never-ending sequence of sparkling coastal views, along with funky formations and time-honoured seaside destinations, ensure this path requires an unhurried pace.

In contrast, the dramatic coastal vistas are backed by a profusion of majestic rainforest, waterfalls, and other gems found within neighbouring Great Otway National Park.

Accommodation options: BIG4 parks in the Great Ocean Road region.

The Great Ocean Road is a stunner.

Kakadu National Park, NT

Australia’s largest national park is phenomenal, delivering copious amounts of serious eye-candy alongside culturally significant locations. Kakadu has earned World Heritage status for both its natural and cultural worth, which is a rarity. Expect dazzling gorges and waterfalls, lush wetlands, and rugged escarpments and to be amazed by Aboriginal rock art that dates as far back as 50,000 years.

Accommodation option: BIG4 Howard Springs Holiday Park.

Nature is at its best within Kakadu National Park. Credit: Tourism NT/Daniel Tran.

Port Arthur Historic Site, TAS

There’s a certain eeriness to this infamous convict settlement that juxtaposes with the peaceful surrounds. And it’s easy to get swept up by it all. This is the most intact convict site in Australia, and the well-preserved nature of this World Heritage-listed site helps bring to life the many colourful and evocative stories that abound. Fascinating.

Accommodation options: NRMA Port Arthur Holiday Park or BIG4 Hobart Airport Tourist Park.

It's easy to get swept up in it all at Port Arthur Historic Site. Credit: Alastair Bett.

Swimming with whale sharks – Ningaloo Reef, WA

Sharing the water with whale sharks is an exhilarating experience. The sheer size of these animals is almost unfathomable – up to 18m in length – and their distinctive markings appear painted on. Luckily, they don’t consider humans to be particularly tasty. Whale sharks reliably congregate around Ningaloo Reef, part of the wider World Heritage-listed Ningaloo Marine Park.

Accommodation option: RAC Exmouth Cape Holiday Park

Swimming with a whale shark in WA's Ningaloo Reef is as thrilling as it gets. Credit: Tourism Western Australia.

Coober Pedy, SA

There’s uniqueness, and then there’s Coober Pedy. This distinctive town is well-known for its underground buildings, including pubs and shops, lunar-like landscapes, rich opal-mining culture, and various quirks. And within day-trip distance are some attention-grabbing natural wonders like the colourful hills of Kanku-Breakaways Conservation Park.

Accommodation option: BIG4 Stuart Range Outback Resort.

Kanku-Breakaways Conservation Park is a day-trip must from Coober Pedy. Credit: Skye Reynolds.

Sydney, NSW

Simply put, Sydney is stunning. The NSW capital regularly draws the eyes of the world and provides visitors with its own bucket list. It's home to landmark structures like the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, iconic Darling Harbour, and famous beaches like Bondi. And that’s just the start.

Accommodation options: Ingenia Holidays Nepean River or NRMA Sydney Lakeside Holiday Park.

Sydney boasts some of Australia's biggest landmarks.

Tjoritja West MacDonnell National Park, NT

This attraction is somewhat underrated, yet flying under the radar is a large part of its appeal. Comfortably reached from Alice Springs, the national park dishes up a succession of remarkable natural features and sacred Aboriginal sites: gorges, chasms, colourful ochre pits, springs, and more. And when visiting, you might be lucky enough to have it to yourself.

Accommodation option: BIG4 MacDonnell Range Holiday Park, Alice Springs.

Ormiston Gorge is one of many highlights in Tjoritja West MacDonnell National Park. Credit: Tourism NT/Jesse Lindemann.

Mona, TAS

The Museum of Old and New Art (Mona) is firmly entrenched as one of Tasmania’s most popular attractions. Located in Hobart, Mona quickly shatters any preconceptions that this is just another museum. A series of quirky, thought-provoking, and even confronting displays and exhibits have led to worldwide acclaim.

And it’s much more than a museum. Mona includes a cellar door, bars, a restaurant, café, and regular events like comedy and jazz.

Please note: MONA is currently closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Accommodation option: BIG4 Hobart Airport Tourist Park.

MONA offers much more than just quirky, thought-provoking art. Credit: Adam Gibson.

Mt Kosciuszko, NSW

Climbing Australia’s tallest mountain during warmer months has to be on the bucket list. While Mt Kosciuszko is a baby compared to the likes of many of the world’s tallest peaks, it still presents a fair old challenge. This 2228m-high mountain strongly rewards those who reach its summit with awe-inspiring views extending over the diverse landscape of Kosciuszko National Park and beyond.

Kosciuszko National Park is an Australian icon, as it's home to our highest peak.

The Kimberley, WA

An area of exceptional beauty in North West WA, the Kimberley features some of the most awe-inspiring natural attractions on earth. Marvel at incredible waterfalls, rock formations, gorges, and so much else. The peculiar Bungle Bungle Range is among the many highlights.

Beauty abounds in the Kimberley. Pictured: Mitchell Falls, Mitchell River National Park. Credit Sean Scott.

Isn't it time you enjoyed a bucket-list experience? Start your adventures by booking your next BIG4 break now.

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